Tech News
fastcompany:

5 Stupid Reasons You’re Underpaid- And How To Fix Them 
You are not being out-earned because you are being out-skilled.  People often have blindspots about getting paid— so pull back the veil and start earning what you’re worth. 

Dave Fecak knows whywe aren’t making enough. Fecak has had long exposure to technologists’ salaries: He’s been a part of software recruiting since 1998. And while his points are directly intended for programmers, they carry currency beyond coders.
These are the reasons you aren’t making enough.

Image consciousness
The first negotiation
Know the market (and your place in it)
Profit or cost?
Skill scarcity
Here’s the story.
Why are you underpaid?

fastcompany:

5 Stupid Reasons You’re Underpaid- And How To Fix Them 

You are not being out-earned because you are being out-skilled.  People often have blindspots about getting paid— so pull back the veil and start earning what you’re worth. 

Dave Fecak knows whywe aren’t making enough. Fecak has had long exposure to technologists’ salaries: He’s been a part of software recruiting since 1998. And while his points are directly intended for programmers, they carry currency beyond coders.

These are the reasons you aren’t making enough.

  • Image consciousness
  • The first negotiation
  • Know the market (and your place in it)
  • Profit or cost?
  • Skill scarcity

Here’s the story.

Why are you underpaid?

guardian:

Manhattan is seen from the One World Observatory on the 100th floor of One World Trade Center at the Ground Zero site in New York City today. One World Observatory, which is situated more than 1,250 feet over lower Manhattan, will open to the public in 2015. Photograph: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

guardian:

Manhattan is seen from the One World Observatory on the 100th floor of One World Trade Center at the Ground Zero site in New York City today. One World Observatory, which is situated more than 1,250 feet over lower Manhattan, will open to the public in 2015. Photograph: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Bislr Launches Tools To Build Marketing-Optimized Websites, Raises $3.5M From Tim Draper And Others

bislr logo

Bislr, a startup that’s officially launching today, was built to solve one of the problems that CEO Michael Sharkey said that he himself faced in his past startups — the need to quickly build a website that integrates the different applications that marketers use.

So Bislr integrates with existing marketing automation (MA) and customer relationship management (CRM) tools, layering on a drag-and-drop website builder and additional analytics. The idea is to allow marketers to launch new campaign websites without having to consult a developer, and those sites collect relevant customer data and be easily edited based on that data.

The company is also announcing that it has raised $3.5 million in Series A funding led by Southern Cross Venture Partners, with participation by Tim Draper and Terry and Katrina Garnett.

Sharkey gave me a quick demo covering a number of the major features. The basic building blocks of a Bislr websites include the company’s “social apps”, which allow marketers to easily embed content from your social networking accounts onto the company website — so if they come up with a brilliant promotional video, they’re not driving traffic to YouTube, but to their own site. And the websites are automatically optimized for mobile and other

Behind the scenes, Bislr also creates a profile of each visitor and “everything they’re doing when they’re touching the site,” Sharkey said. When possible, it also pulls social data from around the web about each visitor — so businesses can see in real-time tweets and Facebook updates from people visiting their site. And the service makes it easy to act on that data, too. For example, if a business wants to test out different wording or different designs, Bislr can run A/B tests on a small group of users, then automatically select the version that’s better.

Sharkey founded the company with his two brothers. They’ve been testing out the system with a few small businesses, he said, but now they’ve opened up and are ready to serve larger customers.


Via TechCrunch: http://tcrn.ch/X6k42U

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from Blog ALL http://bit.ly/15dVz7d
Free Ride Will Soon Be Over For Google Compute Engine Limited Preview Beta Users

Google Compute Engine-1

Google Compute Engine Limited Preview beta customers who want to continue using the cloud service will have to fork over their credit-card numbers after receiving emails announcing the March 1 end of their free trials. Google has offered the service for free to beta customers since launching it at the Google I/O conference last June.

For those who do not want to continue to use the service, the email asks that customers terminate running their virtual machines, remove persistent disk data storage and disable projects before the March 1 deadline. Customers that continue using Google Compute will pay by credit card for the virtual machines they have running on the service.

According to the email, after adding a credit card to the Google API Console, customers will start getting charged at Google’s standard rates. If customers don’t add a credit card, then Google will start removing data and instances. After that, customers will have to re-apply to the limited preview if they wish to continue trying the paid service. The first bill will appear in early April.

Users of the limited preview have so far had favorable reviews of the service, particularly noting how fast it is in spinning up instances.

There is no word when the service will officially launch.

Google has not responded yet to a request for a comment.


Via TechCrunch: http://tcrn.ch/11HCZp9

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from Blog ALL http://bit.ly/15dVz7j
Car Apps Finally Get What They Need: Geeks

Mashable OP-ED

The quickest way to cooking through just about any half-baked tech: Bring on the geeks!

Case in point: Auto infotainment systems. Good intentions aside, even the most advanced (some might say: especially the most advanced) touch-screen car consoles can be unnecessarily difficult and distracting.

So I gotta give GM and Ford credit for realizing that basement hackers are probably their best hope at cracking this code. Earlier this year at CES, both auto giants announced that they were opening up their in-car infotainment systems to outside developers, who will be free to make apps and interfaces that can hopefully expand our cars’ functionality, without sacrificing safe…
Continue reading…

Via mashable: http://on.mash.to/12BpjqH

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from Blog ALL http://bit.ly/Vh42T6
The iPad App That’s Changing Fashion Week

Fashion Week is about coordinating show invites, seating charts, photos, and editorial samples — a process that got a lot easier this year thanks to the iPad and an app called Fashion GPS.

While its couture may be on the cutting edge, Fashion Week’s tech has been slipping for some time. “What’s really oddly funny about fashion is that we’re really progressive as far as the arts and we’re really clever with design,” Fashion GPS’ Jennifer Jann told Mashable. “However, administratively, we’re a big mess.”

The app takes a lot of the headache out of organizing events, sending out the invites and dishing editorial samples. It is already used by a number of top names.

“Afte…
Continue reading…

More About: App, iOS, ipad, iphone

Via mashable: http://on.mash.to/YeMgyE

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from Blog ALL http://bit.ly/Vh425K
Topshop and Google Partner for Innovative Fashion Week Show

Although an increasing number of designers are live streaming their Fashion Week shows online, only a very few offer anything beyond semi-blurry, front-camera views of models on a runway. Among those ‘very few’ is UK retailer Topshop, which is once again engineering a unique, multi-platform show experience for online viewers, this time in partnership with Google, for its London Fashion Week show at the Tate Modern on Sunday.

Topshop is calling it “The Future of the Fashion Show,” and it’s designed to let audiences see the show from every point of view — from that of a model on the runway, to a makeup artist backstage, to the celebrity or buyer in the front row.

Leading up to show…
Continue reading…

More About: fashion, Google, lfw, london fashion week, topshop

Via mashable: http://on.mash.to/YeMgyv

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from Blog ALL http://bit.ly/Vh425G
So Yeah, There’s Gonna Be A Vince Vaughn And Owen Wilson Movie About Life As A Google Intern

the internship


Geographically Hollywood is hundreds of miles away from Silicon Valley, but it seems like the two are getting closer and closer in metaphorical ways.

The latest example of this is The Internship, the new buddy movie starring Vince Vaughn and Owen Wilson that’s set to premiere this upcoming summer. In it, Vaughn and Wilson play middle-aged laid off salesmen who somehow nab internships at Google. Bespectacled genius 20-somethings are their bosses, they don’t exactly fit in, and of course hilarity ensues.

It’s no surprise that the somewhat wacky world of today’s tech industry is attractive story fodder to showbiz types: The Social Network showed just how compelling these stories can be on the big screen. And what it’s like to work at companies such as Facebook and Google have held special allure to the mainstream for years now (as I say in my disclosure form, my spouse works at Google — and every holiday season he fields questions about Google’s free food and other widely-reported job perks from even my most unplugged family members.)

But what is a bit surprising is the degree to which it seems Google participated in the making of The Internship. The cast is said to have had access to Google’s Mountain View headquarters as they were preparing to make the movie, and Google itself has put out an enthusiastic statement of support that says: “We’re excited that Vince Vaughn and Owen Wilson chose the Google campus as a backdrop for their first film together since Wedding Crashers.” Yesterday, Google’s homepage (a notoriously sparse space that typically only gives occasional links to its own new products or big charity causes) even included a prominent link to a Google+ Hangout with Vaughn and Wilson that was apparently part of the movie’s promotional push.

It’s a far cry from, say, Facebook’s response to The Social Network, which was mostly silence punctuated by occasional flat-out rejections. They are two very different types of movies, of course, but it is interesting to see a company play along so much here.

Anyway. The trailer just hit the web today, and it’s embedded above.


Via TechCrunch: http://tcrn.ch/X6gcPo

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from Blog ALL http://bit.ly/12Bpja4
Opera Sings The Final Song With Its Rendering Engine, Decides To Shift To WebKit

operabig

Opera is that company that everyone knows about but never really stopped to understand why it is so important. The Norway-based company has always been an ankle-biter, pushing the envelope and calling out the big guys for injustices put upon web developers and Internet surfers. It’s not a sexy position to be in, but Opera has always stood its ground.

Today, Opera has announced that it will be slowly abandoning its own web-rendering “Turbo” engine in lieu of WebKit, the core development platform used by Chrome and Safari. In a way, today is a sad day. The company might have fallen on its own sword for the greater good, one final time.

By never having the pole position in the “browser war,” Opera had the freedom to try new things and make noise about the issues that really matter, including being able to choose your default browser on the desktop. There was a time when Microsoft PC users had no option of which browser to use; Internet Explorer came bundled with the operating system. It was an anti-trust situation — a monopoly if you will. Opera stood up and fought.

How hard has it fought? Here’s a quote from then-CEO of Opera, Jon von Tetzchner, from a 2007 press release which announced Opera’s EU anti-trust complaint against Microsoft:

We are filing this complaint on behalf of all consumers who are tired of having a monopolist make choices for them. In addition to promoting the free choice of individual consumers, we are a champion of open Web standards and cross-platform innovation. We cannot rest until we’ve brought fair and equitable options to consumers worldwide.

This quote is what Opera stands for, and with today’s announcement, a little bit of Opera died. Von Tetzchner left the company in 2011 and the company became decreasingly aggressive in the years after. When von Tetzchner left, he sent a very strong-worded and poignant email describing how things had fallen apart:

It has become clear that The Board, Management and I do not share the same values and we do not have the same opinions on how to keep evolving Opera.

From its own blog post, you can tell how hard this decision was to make, as it was something that was better for users and developers, both of whom Opera cares deeply about:

On the same day as announcing that Opera has 300 million users, we’re also announcing that for all new products Opera will use WebKit as its rendering engine and V8 as its JavaScript engine. It’s built using the open-source Chromium browser as one of its components. Of course, a browser is much more than just a renderer and a JS engine, so this is primarily an “under the hood” change. Consumers will initially notice better site compatibilty, especially with mobile-facing sites – many of which have only been tested in WebKit browsers. The first product will be for Smartphones, which we’ll demonstrate at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona at the end of the month. Opera Desktop and other products will transition later.

Opera has always pushed so hard to make its browser fast, as if to make the web sing for people all over the world, no matter what type of device they’re on. The company has also made tabbed browsing something we’re all used to, by making it faster than everyone else did at the time. By choosing to develop its product on top of WebKit, it is, in essence, giving up. It’s not a stretch to say that Google was able to pass Microsoft with its Chrome browser because all of the work that Opera has put into the space, tirelessly fighting for more cross-platform friendliness and putting an end to a No. 1-by-default situation.

A sentiment of sadness is being shared by developers and former Opera employees:

However, not everyone is crying about the move, considering the fact that if Opera can bring its tenacity to developing for WebKit, everyone wins. Sr. Director of User Interface Engineering at PayPal, Bill Scott, shared these thoughts with us:

I am a big fan of webkit because I am focused on the user’s experience more than I am with being a standards purist. I know that some of my colleagues feel like that we as web developer’s failed because we did not ensure all of our experiences worked on Opera. But what they forget is that this is a marketplace. Companies can only reasonably test on just a few platforms. At the end of the day our users shouldn’t have to pay for our fractured platforms. In no other software area do we have to deal with this many “standards”. Moving closer to a single platform means we can spend more time building experiences rather than showing off our encyclopedic knowledge of browser variants to one another.

Netflix took the approach in late 2009 to settle on webkit as their SDK for all TV experiences which folded nicely into mobile & tablet strategy (by and large this is webkit). I know that the web team there had some browser envy since the TV team could just code for webkit. But being able to settle on webkit really made development move a lot faster.

If we can take the talent of the Opera team and apply it to webkit this will be a big win. And if we could just get IE to switch then we will have arrived at near-nirvana.

The tide has turned today, but we know that without Opera’s work on keeping browsers speedy and open, yet standarized, there wouldn’t be a Firefox or a Chrome or any other alternative browser. The “nirvana” that Scott mentions is a place where developers know exactly what they’re coding for, without worry that they’ll have to refactor everything for a completely different platform. If Microsoft were to shift to WebKit, you can thank Opera. Again.

[Photo credit: Seattle PI]


Via TechCrunch: http://tcrn.ch/12BcNHB

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from Blog ALL http://bit.ly/Vh41P5
On The Next Web, iOS commands more than double the page views of Android, 32 times that of Windows Phone

2013 02 13 17h23 04 520x245 On The Next Web, iOS commands more than double the page views of Android, 32 times that of Windows Phone

Mining your traffic analytics is a good habit to have, given that the information can tell you stories that you can’t find in any other data set. TNW’s readership data well illustrates the current stakes of the mobile market: iOS and Android are the bosses, while Windows Phone and BlackBerry scramble for comparative scraps.

Putting this in perspective, here are the raw figures, as a percentage of TNW’s overall traffic from the last 30 days of TNW traffic (8 figure pageviews):

  • iOS: 17.06%
  • Android: 8.3%
  • Windows Phone: 0.52%
  • BlackBerry: 0.35%
  • Symbian: 0.06%

Yes, I included Symbian for fun. Now, what those numbers indicate is that among techies, our audience here, iOS is around 32.8 times as popular for browsing the site. Naturally, it could be that iOS users also rack up more pageviews per user, so don’t use the figures above as indicative of market share, but instead, presence.

Something else worth knowing: Despite being web-focused, Chrome OS accounts for a 0.1% of TNW’s traffic.

Now, if iOS devices account for 17.06% of TNW’s traffic, how does OS X fare? Only a touch higher, accounting for 21.17% of our pageviews. Put another way, iOS drives 80% as many pageviews to TNW as OS X. Given the comparative ages of the platforms, that’s stunning.

Windows, naturally, reigns supreme: 48.39%. Still, among our readership, even with Windows Phone traffic added to it, Windows-based devices fail to reach the 50% mark. In short, you are all a gift to Apple’s bottom line.

For fun, here is a pie chart of our mobile readership. You get bonus points if you are reading this post on an iPad.

Via thenextweb: http://tnw.co/ZbwObx

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from Blog ALL http://bit.ly/VVCxf2